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Somewhere Under The Rainbow

June 26, 2013

I like chard.

Yes, I like the taste of it, but moreover I really just like the way it looks in the garden. Healthy chard leaves are broad and waxy with full-bodied color and interesting contrast between the green leaves and the veins/stems. Individually, I’ve planted the appropriately named “Fordhook Giant” with the whitish stems along the Ruby Red variety.

But the grab-bag “Rainbow” packages offer some of the prettiest plants. Yellow, orange, peach, white, red, these group together nicely until you can no longer resist and start harvesting. There isn’t actually a “rainbow” variety, these are all separately grown by color then the seeds are mixed for sale.

(click to zoom)

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This patch was almost abandoned when sprouting due to heavy slug attacks but eventually they relented. We can see this little patch from the sunroom and as pretty as it might be, it is harvest time. Even though this is one of the front “herb” beds on the daily drip irrigation cycle, the intense sun and heat of July in Georgia will be too much for it in this location. Besides, the volunteer Dill that has come up among and adjacent to it is ready to own the location.

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8 Comments leave one →
  1. Brent Eamer permalink
    June 26, 2013 6:38 am

    I have not started my Rainbow yet, but maybe late July for a fall crop. Im letting my Kale from last fall go to seed this year and Im going to save it. Your photography is most excellent B.

    • June 26, 2013 6:54 am

      Thank you!

  2. June 26, 2013 9:58 am

    They look great! We planted a row of Swiss chard, and it’s not looking so hot :-/ They were doing well for a while, and now it seems they haven’t grown at all in the last few weeks!

    • June 26, 2013 6:02 pm

      Thank you!
      Give them time and water and you probably won’t be disappointed. Don’t give up, here is a story for you:
      I kept cutting the bottom leaves off of some one fall and winter in my makeshift hoop house, expecting it to give up one day. That plant ended up lasting over two years- it kept growing and I even moved it once. The trunk was so big it fell over and looked like a palmetto tree and new chard sprouts came up all along it. See it here: https://cohutt.com/2012/07/29/midsummer-photomapping-part-2/

  3. June 26, 2013 11:13 am

    Chard make good chips. Try it.

    • June 26, 2013 9:25 pm

      kale chips we know, chard chips we do not…

  4. June 28, 2013 8:40 am

    Beautiful stuff…chard. Looks beautiful…tastes beautiful…and how beautifully it photographs.

    • June 30, 2013 8:30 am

      True all

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